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about that in a moment. >> the survival lesson they won't soon forget. they put their phone to good use. >>> if you got your kid an iphone for christmas, i did, my stepdaughter is 13. some are worried they might abuse it. a mom who may have the ultimate solution. she made her son sign an 18-point contract from handing the phone over at approximately 7:30 every night to no porn to mom always knows the passionword. >> a lot of parents are taking note. it's going viral. the rest of this creative contract in a few minutes. >>> speaking of smartphones the insanely addictive game angry birds. there is a real-life version playing out in the florida ev everglades. the mischief vultures are making. >> don't want to make them angry. >>> right to the big digout in the second snowstorm to days. ginger zee has the latest on what we can expect. >> more than 500 flights were delayed. that's just yesterday with this new storm and look at this, a trace to two inches for new york and boston. 80 miles away in connecticut, more than a foot of snow in milford mass, even though it's done. the issues, they're
tonight, with abc's john schriffen leading us off. >> reporter: whiteout conditions in ohio. power poles snapped like twigs in arkansas. and this pickup truck in southern illinois, struggling just to clear a path. the winter blast, now accounting for 15 deaths. most of them on the nation's roads, where black ice led to accident after accident. >> i lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. >> reporter: today, the northeast was digging out. this man spent hours trying to rescue his car here in syracuse. what is it like dealing with this much snow? >> a lot of agony. a lot of back breaking. >> reporter: mother nature is also wreaking havoc in the skies. today alone, close to 700 flights were canceled. in the past 48 hours? nearly 3,000. on new york's long island, this southwest airlines plane skidded off the runway, getting stuck in the mud. 129 passengers evacuated safely. >> tower southwest 4695. >> 4695. >> we just made your day very exciting, at least ours is going to be. we just taxied off t
. >> absolutely. >> eliot: robert reich professor at u.c. berkeley. thank you for joining us. >> thanks, eliot. >> eliot: that's "viewpoint" for tonight. have a great [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> bill: hey, hey, hello everybody. it is tuesday. >> >> bill: hey, everybody. wednesday morning, december 19th. good to see you today. welcome to the "full-court press" here on current tv coming to you live from our nation's capitol with all of the big stories of the day all of the big news of the day on the fiscal cliff front and on the gun control front as well as what's happening in syria and other news around the current tree and around the globe. we will take your calls at 866-55-press. the president has made a big compromise, raising the tax cuts to the first $400,000 dropping the payroll tax holiday and, get this cutting social security benefits. wait a minute. i thought social security was not going to be on the table. he promised us that. has the president sold us down the river already? 0, man. lots to talk about. but first, we get the latest. today's c
violence in this society. just putting more deadly weapons out there. >> reporter: and as for how the u.s. would pay to put armed officers in every american school, as the nra recommends, lester, lapierre pointed the u.s. is spending billion of dollars year to train police in iraq and asked why federal dollars can't be used to train school guards here at home. >> peter alexander, thanks. another one of lapierre's claims that producers of movies, tv shows and video games are more responsible for real-life gun violence than guns themselves. from los angeles, nbc's mike taibbi takes a closer look at the issue of violence in our popular culture. >> reporter: it was a week after the explosion of gunfire in newtown that the nra's wayne lapierre called hollywood and the gaming industry enablers and co-conspirators in a culture of gun violence. >> a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. >> reporter: hollywood knows the poll body count is high and profitable. five of the year's top ten grossing
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
of touch. give us a behind-the-scenes look at who he is and how he relates to people. >> reporter: well, senator kerry is a statesman, a man who has been working in washington for so many years that it is easy to paint a caricature of him that way. he is a man who has developed a relationship with president obama which is what's meaningful today and here at the white hou house. he is, as kate pointed out, was dispatched by the president not just two times or a number of times during foreign sort of mini crises, but very, very delicate situations and he has successfully eased the way when he went with, for example, to afghanistan to talk to president hamid scar karzai, to encourage to run for a runoff election and he got it done. the president has seen him demonstrate his abilities as a diplomat and of course, in the debate prep with president obama, he played mitt romney during this most recent round of debate preps. it didn't start out so well, as we know, but it ended well for the president and they had a strong connection and the president in the end thought that, you know, he came t
are using hiv to help fight cancer. it's coming up on "world news now." >>> "world news now" weather brought to you by consumer cellula cellular. >>> a dramatic new direction in fighting cancer is now raising hopes of finding a way to eliminate the disease all together. >> this is just unbelievable. doctors are using the virus that causes aids to reprogram patient's immune systems. chief medical editor dr. richard besser explains. >> reporter: emma's leukemia seemed undefeatable, no treatments left, and she was only 6. then in april, a last gamble using hiv to cure, not kill. doctors took out millions of emma's disease fighting white blood cells and used a genetically altered hiv virus to get into human immune systems to change those cells to target cancer fighters. they went back in and destroyed the cancer. dr. steven gruff is a pioneer. using hiv to infiltrate the hiv system. >> all of the things that make the hiv virus to cause disease have been removed from this particular virus, so its only purpose is to put a gene into a cell. for me, it's incredibly exciting. >> reporter: here's emma
in snow. she shows us the tricks she used to survive and how she managed to escape. >>> and we asked, is it real or is it fake? that video of an eagle snatching up a baby, blowing up so fast. grabbing more than 16 million views in two days. it worked. but, yes, it's a hoax. this morning, we go straight to the source to learn the secrets of how they did it. >>> good morning, america. hi to robin at home. great to have elizabeth vargas back. paula faris in today. i'm surrounded. this is great. >> george's angels. >> that's right. >> and by the way, i knew it was a hoax. i knew that eagle wasn't grabbing that baby. >>> we have a lot to get to today. including the fiscal cliff showdown. talks have broken down. house republicans are going to push a fallback plan today. they're trying to make sure that taxes don't go up for anyone making under $1 million. will it help or hurt the negotiations? >>> and president obama front and center on the gun control debate, promising yesterday quick action. we'll show you how some cities are arming teachers. while many parents are taking safety in
. the president used his bully pulpit to reinforce the idea that senators need to get busy. so let's listen. >> the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable, why everything always has to wait till the last minute. we're now at the last minute. and the american people are not going to have any patience for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. not right now. >> so jessica, you were in the room for the president's remarks. on a scale of 1 to 10, let's measure the anger perhaps that was emanating from the president right now with congress waiting until this last-minute deal. how angry is he? >> well, he definitely was using the bully pulpit to pressure congress to get something done this weekend. i'd say he seemed frustrated, but i definitely have seen him more frustrated, and today he wasn't totally out of patience, and today, martin, he said that he believes "we may be able to reach an agre
to have you with us this morning. we will tell you -- bring you up to date on all of the latest news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. and word is out this morning that roger ails told david petraeus when he was still in iraq that he should quit and run for president of the united states against barack obama and if he did so, roger ails said he would quit fox news and run his campaign. how about it. don't tell me fox news is not the broadcast arm of the republican party. that proves it! all right. we'll get into that and a whole lot more here. first we get the latest current news update from lisa ferguson out in los angeles. hi lisa. good morning. >> hey bill. good morning everyone. so far the president seems to be staying strong when it comes to taxes. as you all know by now house republicans sent in a fiscal cliff counter offer yesterday but the white house is calling it no good. i want to give you an idea of where the two sides stand right now. boehner's new plan would raise $2.2 trill
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
's he friday, december 28th. on set with us the co-host of "sfreet signs" is brian sullivan who just showed up here. president of the national action network is rev raend al sharpton and fortune editor lee gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's m
the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water
dickens visited us in 1840, he was truly blown away by high water pressure on the fourth floor of the hotel he was staying in. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from
to bashar al-assad the syrian dictator who is fighting a rebellion by his own people. assad has not used his chemical weapons, including nerve gas, but the possibility that he might threatens to pull the united states into that middle east conflict. here's how mr. obama put it. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command. the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> pelley: so why did the president say it today? david martin hat the pentagon has been talking to his sources. >> reporter: this is a commercial satellite photo of a syrian chemical weapons base. u.s. monitoring of roughly two dozen bases like this indicates the assad regime has begun preparing its chemical weapons for use. orders have been issued to bring together chemical ingredients which are normally stored separately for safety, but when combined form a deadly nerve agent sarin. throughout months of heavy fighting, intelligence ana
on monday. fox business network's stuart varney joins us now. hi, stu. you say this is the big story people aren't talking about? >> it is a sleeper issue, patti ann. on monday the government officially runs out of money and it can not borrow anymore. so it will have to shift all kind of cash around to make sure they can pay their bills and maybe they can do that for a couple of months. means you can kick the can, eight weeks be maybe, until the absolute crunch comes. there are consequences to this. it could be that america will be downgraded again. after all back in august of 2011 the last time we had this debt ceiling crisis, we were downgraded, no longer aaa. they're threatening the same thing again if we can't get a deal this time around and again the government runs out of money come monday. it is a very big deal. it is pressing right upon us and new year's eve is the right upon us. patti ann: what a happy new year's eve we'll have. any impact on mortgages? >> no. no impact on mortgages that is an opinion. ben bernanke says look, i will spend $45 billion each and every month buying mor
is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia deve
and the celebrities answering the calls from people who phoned in donations, galaxy phones they were using. you're seeing galaxy ads everywhere, they dominate football games on sundays as well. apple, the ipad, ipad mini, the iphone their ads have been swamped by samsung and microsoft. is apple still the king of cool? shareholders wants to know and so do i. let's bring in mark, editor in chief of laptop magazine. is apple still the king of cool? what do you say. >> when it comes to the design and getting the latest apps first, would i say yes for apple, but perception is becoming reality when it comes to the marketing ads you're talking about. when people see the big screen galaxy note 2 and in the office when i show people turn it on its side and two applications running on the screen the same time and pen input. in a lot of areas they're out-innovating apple and outmarketing apple, apple's bread and butter for a long time. stuart: mark, we'll get you more on the microsoft surface tablet. hold on a second i've got this for you. you want cool? take a look at this house, a mansion this miami on
, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ theme ♪ ] [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation, on your radio and on current tv this is "the bill press show." >> bill: all right. 30 days now before we tumble off of the fiscal cliff. will john boehner get out of the way and let us avoid another fiscal crisis? hey, good morning, everybody. what do you say? here we go. on a great big monday monday december 3rd, good to see you today. hope you had a good weekend and watched some good football got maybe some holiday shopping christmas shopping. a lot of people around here in the eastern market neighborhood of capitol hill buying their christmas trees. i saw them all day saturday all day sunday loading x-rays trees on top of the cars going home, carrying them home to deck raid the x-rays -- decorate the christmas trees. lots to talk about this morning here around the country, around the globe, around here in washington, d.c. we will bring you up to date on the latest to let you know what's going on, but most importantly, give you a chance to
>> good morning, everyone. thanks for joining us. i'm carolyn tyler. let's start with a quick first look at the weather with our meteorologist frances dinglasan in for lisa argen. >> thanks, carolyn. good morning, everyone. here's a look at live doppler 7hd. a big change this morning. no rain here in the bay area but i want to take you up to tahoe, where we are picking up some snowfall, the areas of white there in the south tahoe area. chains are required on highway 50. for us, you can expect a cool and clear start so we are starting to see the clouds break up. cool numbers, though, with temperatures in the low 30s to near 40. by this afternoon more sunshine. temperatures climbing up into the low 50s. some upper 40s stick around. then this evening we cool around again with clearer skies. we will be dropping down into the 40s if you have evening plans. carolyn? >> thank you, frances. breaking news in san jose, where investigators continue sifting through the charred rue ins of an apartment. three people died after flames swept through third apartment last night. kira klapper has been
. >> we're tracking a disturbance that will give us bad weather. eastern texas around the houston area, thunderstorms will pop up. that spreads eastward throughout christmas tuesday. interstates 10 and 20, large hail, damaging wind gusts, the threat for tornado. a destructive storm system on this tuesday. the highest threat for tornadoes around new orleans, mobile, interstate 10 northward into the panhandle of florida. good snow across portions of the plains. >> i hate to see rough weather this time of the year. >>> let's look at weather from across the country. last-minute shoppers in boston and chicago could see light know. also early showers and clearing in l.a. rain in louisville and cincinnati. >> fargo, barely makes it above zero. honolulu and miami, the hot spots, near 80. seattle and portland, the 40s. >>> a senator from idaho apologizing today after being arrested for driving drunk. mike crapo was pulled over after running a red light yesterday. he failed several sobriety tests. he was taken to jail and released on bond. he's expected to be in court in january. he says he take
president of south africa is in the hospital. bazi kanani joins us from pretoria, south africa. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. nelson mandela is being treated for a lung infection here in the capital city of pretoria. that's a serious condition for a man of his age. even though his health has been declining recent years, he was well enough this summer to receive visitors at his home, including the clinton family. mandela has been treated for a lung infection before. this is his fourth day in the hospital. his longest hospitalization in the past several years. doctors say he is responding to treatment. there's no reason to panic. they're also asking south africans to keep their revered leader in their prayers. josh? >> bazi kanani in south africa. >>> here at home, a medical helicopter has crashed west of chicago, killing two nurses and a pilot flying to a nearby hospital. the chopper crashed in a field near rochelle. no word why it crashed. >>> major, new concerns about the war in afghanistan this morning. u.s. troops are set to withdraw in a matter of months. but a ne
forget. also, those kids put their phone to good use. if you got your kid an iphone for christmas -- i did, my stepdaughter is 13 -- got an iphone. a lot of parents are worried that he or she might abuse it. a mom who may have the ultimate solution. she made her son sign an 18-point contract that includes everything from hand the phone over to your parents at 7:30 every night to no porn to mom always knows the password. >> a lot of parents are taking note this morning. it's going viral. we'll tell you about the rest of this creative contract in a few minutes. >>> speaking of smartphones, we've all heard of the insanely addictive game angry birds. there is a real-life version playing out in the florida everglades. the mischief that vultures are making coming up. >> i don't want to make those birds angry. >>> we do want to get right to the big digout from the second snowstorm in days. putting a hamper on a lot of miles an hours' americans' travel plans. ginger zee has the latest on what we can expect. ginger? >> more than 500 flights were delayed. new storm, and look at this, a trace to
the bay area. picking up partly cloudy skies. most of us with gray skies and here is some of that last bit of rain. the system will push toward the south. seeing just a lit of bit of light rain over morgan hill. low snow level down to 3,000 feet. some of the mountains could pick up a dusting of snow. they could pick up an up much or two before it's done. backing up to see. here is the center of the storm. now west of monterey. it'll continue to sink south and taking the rain with it. for most of us it'll be a chilly one. temperatures right now in the 40s and it's breezy. what you can expect at this hour and what you can expect for the afternoon coming up. >> and happening now a high srf advisory along bay area beaches on the heels of the tragic death of a man and boy who were swept out to sea. we are live in pacifica with more onto precautions people need to take today. >> reporter: you can hear and see the roar of the waves here behind us. we are next to the pacifica pier. there is a high surf advisory in effect until ten tonight. the weather service is predicting swells as high as ten t
will tell us how it will affect your travel plans. >> nothing makes ginger happier than a big winter storm. we'll talk to her in just a moment. >>> speaking of travel. this is exactly what you do not want to hear after you've ponied up for a christmas cruise on "the queen mary 2." the captain warning passengers not to use the public bathrooms or eat at the buffet. we'll have that coming up. >>> and battling a stomach bug is not an ideal to lose weight. but shooting pounds is always at the top of the list for new year's resolutions. if that's your plan, we have a feline that can help. meet tiny tim. in one year, this cat lost 20% of his body weight. we'll tell you his secrets and how they can help trim down your body in 2013. that's still ahead. >> he's an inspiration to all of us. >>> we're going to start this morning with insult to injury. round two of back-to-back winter storms, right now, rolling through a huge swath of this country. the timing could not be worse for people trying to travel for the holidays, either get home or get somewhere else. abc's meteorologist ginger zee tracking
criticism over her first response to the attack that killed the u.s. ambassador to libya. margaret brennan is at the state department. margaret, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah and charlie. cbs news has learned susan rice privately began expressing doubts about her nomination to friends this week saying the attacks had reached a fevered pitch. then yesterday she had a phone conversation with president obama and withdrew her name from consideration as secretary of state. >> i would have been very honored to serve in that job, just as i'm delighted to do what i'm doing. but yes, sure how can you not want to in my field serve at the highest possible level? >> reporter: last night u.n. ambassador susan rice explained why she asked president obama not to consider her for secretary of state. in an op-ed she wrote, quote, a national security appointment, much less a potential one, should never be turned into a political football. there are far bigger issues at stake. on twitter she posted those of you who know me know that i'm a fighter, but not at th
in this country. what should be the role of the federal and state government if any in mental health? also send us a tweet, twitter.com c-spanwj or facebook .com/c-span or send us an e-mail. let me begin with the hill newspaper this morning and this headline. mass murders spark wide debate on violence. congressional debate in newtown, connecticut has gone far beyond gun control to include a focus on mental health programs and pervasive violence in popular culture. lawmakers calls for an examination of those issues echo president obama who want a comprehensive approach for violence prevention that would end tougher gun laws and take on a culture of violence that many fear is ken coaching too much on american life. goes on to say lieberman is a local appropriate. the connecticut will -- jay: do the governments have a role in this? it goes on to say as a population, people with mental illnesses are less violent than the general generation add taggert the biggest red flags for violence are being of sub stance abuser, having a history of aggression, but generalizing -- it is considered far too early to
-called fiscal cliff. so a very big moment in the nation's capital. and to walk us through what might happen we turn to jessica yellin, a chief white house correspondent. jessica, we said up front, it is a long shot, give us a best case scenario. >> reporter: the best case scenario would be that all the leaders walk out of this meeting and say they have a deal. the two senators say they can bring it to a vote, and none of their members will filibuster it. house speaker john boehner says he will bring it to the house floor for a vote before new year's eve and house minority leader nancy pelosi says she can wrangle all the democratic votes it needs to pass because you would expect a lot of house republicans to vote no, so you need almost all the house democrats to vote yes. if that sounds almost too good to be true, it probably is. >> and then they sing kumbaya. never, ever going to happen. and if it does -- >> reporter: they braid each other's hair. >> you got it. we're more likely to see that. so tell us about the role in this meeting of senator mitch mcconnell. why is he a key role to this? >>
salt before the storm in anticipation of the storm. this area is used to getting a lot of snowstorm. two years ago they got almost 180 inches of snowfall. and so this time they're saying, look, we're used to getting snow. the challenge is this amount of snow in such a short period of time, it's been almost two years since syracuse has seen one foot of snow all in one shot, drew. >> it is incredibly pretty pictures from my nice, warm studio, ines. we appreciate you getting up this morning and getting in it. >>> the nba's indiana pacers were actually forced to postpone last night's home game against the chicago bulls. that's a real rarity. take a look at these pictures. getting around the country today and the rest of the week will be a challenge. let's get right to the cnn weather center in atlanta. meteorologist bonnie schneider tracking the system for us. bonnie, good morning. >> good morning. >> what's the latest? it's a huge mess out there. >> it is. it's hitting the northeast hard. you have that heavy rain across new york and long island, across the connecticut sound and really
. we have more on the life of the singer jenni rivera. what can you tell us? >> good morning. she sold 50 million records, won two billboard music awards and was a star of her reality show and served as a judge on a popular talent show in mexico. hard-working until the end. she performed the last concert saturday night in monterey, mexico, hours before dying in a plane crash on her way to yet another commitment. [ speaking spanish ] they call her diva. and for anyone who ever saw her on stage, it was easy to see why. she sang heartwrenching song that's spoke to the common woman, especially mexican-americans. >> translator: every song, every lyric i'm thinking of them and how i can relate to them. >> reporter: jenni rivera was born in long beach, california to mexican parents, their story of humble origins. with an interview in cnn, she spoke about how she sold records at a los angeles flea market and how the family expected cans for the meager income they could bring in selling the metal. >> translator: it is very flattering when they tell me i'm a great artist, a great entertainer. bu
on fire. >> looks like willis' apartment. we'll be back with more. stay with us. >>> well, if you're up with us at this hour, you probably know how it feels to be sleep deprived. >> nearly all of us who didn't get enough, thought we were more awake than we were. abc's ron claiborne took part in that experiment. >> reporter: my eyes are open, but what you can't tell in this experiment is i am actually asleep. every day, 250,000 americans fall asleep while driving. like this woman who was videotaped seemingly nodding off at the wheel in denver. sleep-deprived drivers are blamed for thousands of crashes every year, but many times it's not that obvious. scientists say there is something called microsleep. where you can fall asleep for just a few seconds without realizing it, sometimes with your eyes open. hi, i'm ron claiborne. we traveled to liberty mutual research institute outside of boston where they study microsleep. >> a very brief transition from wakefulness new sleep. it can last up to 20, 30 seconds. you are waking. you are asleep. >> i would drive while sleep deprived. to mimic co
at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson's program, he tells everyone about it. in almost every other program, they don't want to leave that information. if you bring in some kids for the summer, they will invariably tell their classmates when they go back to school things they are not supposed to. we always thought that was too risky and we were never able to do part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is some
and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome and thank you for joining us today. tell us a lot about your background, where you grew up, went to school, the job you worked. >> i was born in a town called and los angeles. it was a lot of working-class folks. my father was a shore worker, my mother was an office worker at usc. my parents were divorced when i was 10 years old, and i moved to the east coast for six years before going back to california after high school. i went to school at uc santa barbara, graduated in 19988 -- 1988. i have lived in the excelsior since 1999. i have had lots of different jobs, but my main job is doing social work force and a disco, i have been a community organizer, i worked at a labor organization supporting janitor's working in our high- rise buildings. i was a legislative aide before .wr. i got to see how it all work from the outside, community organizations supporting young people, children, families, working for labor, and saw how city hall could be an effective tool for change and then considered running in 2007, 2008, and somehow, i m
here on the "full-court press." welcome to the program. thank you so much for joining us and getting ready to sound off on the issues of the day yourself, by giving us a call at 866, 55-press. until one day, one day, right to work, destroying labor unions. labor unions have vowed to fight back. the republican war on labor unions goes on and on in the state of michigan, from wisconsin to ohio and now to michigan we've got to fight back and we will. plus all of the news of the day. but first, we get the latest. start off with today's current news update from lease a ferguson standing buy out in los angeles. hi, lease a. good morning. >> hey, bill. good morning, everyone. as bill mentioned, president obama is taking his fiscal cliff campaign back on the road again today. he is headed today redford, michigan where he will tour a diesel plant and speak to middle class workers. he will push his plan to raise encloses above 250 -- to raise taxes above $250,000 a year. president obama met with house speaker boehner for the first time in more than three weeks. th
us in this mess and they'll pay, too. with incomes of $174,000, they'll pay some $7,500 more in taxes. and it's not just taxes. on january 1, unemployment benefits expire for some 2 million people. you can expect one last effort, including a meeting at the white house with congressional leaders to try to prevent the fiscal cliff from happening. but with just four days left until everybody's taxes go up, there's not a lot of optimism that it can be cone in time. jonathan karl, abc news, new york. >>> tributes are pouring in for retired general norman schwartzcopf. the general, nicknamed stormin' norman, died yesterday in tampa from pneumonia. he commanded a coalition of some 30 countries that drove iraqi forces from kuwait back in 1991. in retirement, he supported charitable causes and resisting calls to rub for public office. norman schwartzcopf was 78. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been pushed to his death in the path of a new york subway train. last night, a woman shoved the man on the tracks just as the train was pulling into the station on queens. it's not clear if
to you by consumer cellular. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> welcome back. since the newtown, connecticut school attack, there's been plenty of talk about arming teachers and two-thirds of americans believe arming at least one official would be somewhat effective against attacks. >> cecilia vega reports. >> reporter: the gun is fake. but these utah teachers fear the threats facing their classrooms is very real. 200 of those teachers became students. packing a conference room on their holiday break to learn how to carry a concealed weapon on the job, and how to protect their schools from an armed intruder. >> the safety is the biggest part and to be able to use them appropriately is really high priority for me. >> reporter: utah is one of few states where public schools allow guns on campus. but in the wake of
. what were you used to being able to do, the simplest things that you couldn't do anymore? >> we probably can't talk about some of them on camera. but you know, getting out of bed, going to the restroom, go brush your teeth. you know, things like that. it physically fares ytears you the point where you lose 20 to 25 pounds and you atrophy. >> i imagine it's like scoreboard watching when you're a coach. >> the doctor came in and said your counts are starting to come up. i said how good are they? he said good enough to go home. so you're like -- it's like a day early. so any way, he says what time is the game? and i said, we play at 1:00 today. he said you should be out of here by noon, and make it home in time to see the game from home. >> and you get to sit in front of your own television, in your own living room and watch the indianapolis colts play. >> yeah, it was awesome. it was a great day. it was a great day. >> wow. >> the emotions from these guys, big guys out there on the football field and know that he fought back. >> so emotional to see life intersect with sports in a
's going to get. tracie potts joins us with the latest on this. good morning. >> reporter: right now it's looking more likely that we could, could, go over that fiscal cliff at the end of the month because right now, negotiations here are at a stand still. president obama talks to the business round table today after telling bloomberg he absolutely won't bunch. the wealthiest americans must pay more. >> we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: he may be in a good position to wait it out. a new poll found more half of americans will blame republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> republicans do not want to touch one hair on the head of one person making over $250,000. that is the rub. >> they've got to come with some specific revenue. they refuse to do that. >> reporter: even other republicans are split on john boehner's plan to avoid tax hikes all together and admit negotiations are going nowhere. >> nothing going on privately that's not going on publicly. >> reporter: republicans say the president needs to meet them halfway. >> he's got to be serious. he's
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